Feb 12/19 Basic Editing

Review of challenge submissions (30 – 40 min)

Quiz (Bill 10 to 15 min): 1: How do you view your pictures – smart phone – computer/laptop – stand alone flat-panel/TV – framed print on wall. 2: How concerned are you about composition and final quality. 3: Are you concerned about computer storage and file management (Henri to compile results)

Break (10 min)

Example of image preparation and post processing. (Jim). Cloning demo (Henri)

Loral’s snowy owl example. Automatic metering problems. Simple dynamic range problems and how to fix them. (Henri)

Where can I find my pictures with “File Manager” (Windows) or “Finder” (Mac). Suggestions for organizing images and storing them elsewhere. External Hard Drives, Cloud Storage. (Henri and Bill)

Exposure problem demonstration

The image below was submitted by Loral shortly after our last meeting on Jan 22.

Camera tries to expose for bright sky, not the bird itself

The problem above is an under exposed subject against a bright sky. In automatic, the camera tries to render detail in the sky, not the bird. To set the exposure the camera thinks in terms of brightness and sets aperture and shutter speed to achieve a grey-blue sky. This causes the bird’s detail to be dull and unattractive. You can choose to put your camera on “Manual” and make a guess at how much to overexpose. The other option is to leave your camera on automatic and make this simple fix in your editing software afterwards. You do this by fixing the “Brightness” slider in your editing program, as in the two images below.

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With the owl now properly exposed but the sky is washed out almost completely

Another way to look at this problem picture is through the brightness histogram. You do this by selecting the levels tool.

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Select the Pure White sample dropper and drag the dropper over to the whitest part of the owl then click.

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The final image has quite a different look with much more nuanced detail in the bird itself

Below a comparison of both methods. The first method is loses a bit more detail than the second one. Notice the retention of pale blue in the sky. Although some people find this too artificial looking. To get a more realistic look, you have to go to much greater length.

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Where are my photos actually located on my Mac

Some users have trouble organizing their images, and would like to have a more structured file system with directory and file names that are understandable by humans. This becomes especially critical if you want to archive images away from your Mac Book for Hard Drive space reasons, or just to reduce the clutter.

Apple has a File Manager called “Finder”. You find it in the bottom left hand corner of your taskbar. The Icon looks like this:

Here are a few screenshots from my ancient 15 year old Mac Mini. I use CANON software to transfer my images from my camera to the computer. It typically creates directories named with the dates tamp ( such as 2019-04-28) This series of screen shots shows how to locate directories and rename them using Apple’s “Finder”

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