Oct 9/18 Session Submissions

I hope all of you enjoyed the presentation and practice session on the subject of Basic Editing, Aperture Preference and Shutter Preference. If you are disappointed with your results, don’t worry. We will cover the same theme next session but with a Halloween flavour. I realize that the flying fish experiment is somewhat difficult for beginners. My recommendation is to get to know your camera a bit better and then experiment. I can guarantee that your results will get better with practice. If you would like to ask questions you can either email me, Jim or Bill directly or pose the question on-line on this page.

I would love to see your picture experiment on this page. So practice and post here.

Here are two Aperture Preference pictures I took to demonstrate the Depth of Field  you can get with a average 18 mm to 35 mm zoom lens that has an aperture range of f/4.0 to f/27. Here are the two extremes of the miniature house scene.

  1. Della Ho says:

    slow shutter speed 1/15

    Reply
  2. Della Ho says:

    fast shutter speed 1/500

    Reply
  3. Della Ho says:

    f14 1/15 300mm ISO 800

    Reply
    • Henri says:

      Nice abstract Della!

      Reply
  4. Della Ho says:

    another image with slow shutter speed 1/15

    Reply
  5. Della Ho says:

    aperture priority f5.6 1/13 300mm ISO 1600

    Reply
  6. Della Ho says:

    f8 1/20 300mm ISO 1250

    Reply
  7. Della Ho says:

    1/400 f5.6 300mm ISO 1250

    Reply
  8. Geoff Turner says:

    This is aperture priority.
    f 5, 1/50, ISO 2500, 80mm
    The close house is in focus but the rest is very fuzzy. The white blob on the left side is the car.

    Reply
  9. Geoff Turner says:

    Again aperture priority.
    f 32, 1/1.3 seconds (=.077 seconds – chosen by the camera) ISO 2500, 80mm
    Now the little guy and the car are in focus – more or less.
    I had the camera set on Aperture priority but also variable ISO. I think the ISO should have been off variable and set lower (400 or 800 eg) to perhaps increase clarity. I used a tripod so a much slower shutter speed would not have been an issue. Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

    Reply
  10. Henri says:

    Example setup of a long silk orchid stem for the Depth of Field experiment. Normal incandescent lighting with camera set on Aperture Preference for minimum Depth of Field (f/4) with focus selection on the tip. Metering mode Centre Weighted Average. Note the black cloth was draped over a ironing board.

    Reply
  11. Henri says:

    Here is the same orchid setup, again taken with Aperture Preference, centre weighted average metering. But now with an aperture of f/22 for maximum depth of field. This image was cropped to get rid of the distracting background.

    Reply
  12. Henri says:

    Here is a combination of ICM (Intentional Camera Movement) and the zipline movement of the flying fish. I was actully trying to follow the fish with very unsteady hands, f/16, 1 sec, ISO 6400. You can get really neat effects with slow shutter speeds!

    Reply
  13. Henri says:

    Here is another example of serendipity (At least in my books). A failed attempt to follow the fish with shaky hands. f/19, 0.5 sec, ISO 6400

    Reply
  14. Henri says:

    Finally at 1/8 of a second was I able to get a reasonable representation of the flying fish. It often takes a bit of experimentation to get a decent picture. Of course decent is a relative term, as I think the first two are more interesting in an artsy sort of way.

    Reply
  15. June says:

    This was shot with Tv setting on 1/500. It chose the aperture. Leading lines – the camera points at the prop and with shallow depth of field the camera and hand are most clearly focused. With such a fast shutter speed the movement of the balls is frozen. The ball on the outside also provides a leading line.

    Reply
  16. June says:

    I am usually not a fan of abstract, but this was a pleasant surprise. The ICM effect was UNINTENTIONAL! I forgot to change my settings from last
    shot (Tv 1/8 and panning with moving camera).There is contrast in patterns on the wall and the wall follows the rule of odds. There is some “dynamic tension” in this shot with the contrast in colour (soft walls/dramatic fish) the direction of the lines (vertical and horizontal in the wall suggest stability VS the diagonal lines of the fish) and there is a triangle at the base of the wall (? a shadow).

    Reply
    • Henri says:

      I like it as an abstract as well June. My personal taste is to crop a bit more away from the top and place the dominant colours in the bottom left 1/3.

      Reply
  17. June says:

    Practicing aperture
    The goal was to feature the bark and tell a story. This photo used Juxtaposition to tell the story (the snow contrasts with the fall colours) colour echo (the green in the leaves pulls out the green in the bark) rule of odds (branch, snow, leaves) texture (the bark) and used the rule of thirds to place the image.

    Reply
    • Henri says:

      Good example of Depth of Field June. Aperture Preference makes taking pictures like this easy.

10 Responses to Oct 9/18 Session Submissions

  1. Della Ho says:

    slow shutter speed 1/15

  2. Della Ho says:

    fast shutter speed 1/500

  3. Della Ho says:

    f14 1/15 300mm ISO 800

  4. Della Ho says:

    another image with slow shutter speed 1/15

  5. Della Ho says:

    aperture priority f5.6 1/13 300mm ISO 1600

  6. Della Ho says:

    f8 1/20 300mm ISO 1250

  7. Della Ho says:

    1/400 f5.6 300mm ISO 1250

  8. Geoff Turner says:

    This is aperture priority.
    f 5, 1/50, ISO 2500, 80mm
    The close house is in focus but the rest is very fuzzy. The white blob on the left side is the car.

  9. Geoff Turner says:

    Again aperture priority.
    f 32, 1/1.3 seconds (=.077 seconds – chosen by the camera) ISO 2500, 80mm
    Now the little guy and the car are in focus – more or less.
    I had the camera set on Aperture priority but also variable ISO. I think the ISO should have been off variable and set lower (400 or 800 eg) to perhaps increase clarity. I used a tripod so a much slower shutter speed would not have been an issue. Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

  10. Henri says:

    Example setup of a long silk orchid stem for the Depth of Field experiment. Normal incandescent lighting with camera set on Aperture Preference for minimum Depth of Field (f/4) with focus selection on the tip. Metering mode Centre Weighted Average. Note the black cloth was draped over a ironing board.

Comments are closed.