Quality Settings

Digital images are recorded in pixels, and camera sensors are often rated in megapixels. Typically the more pixels on the sensor the more resolution or detail you get. However the quality of what gets recorded on the sensor depends on a secondary factor called Noise.  Consider these two otherwise identical pictures. Superficially the are the same but when you enlarge the reflection in the eyeball the quality difference really shows. This image was taken with a fairly high ISO or Film Sensitivity setting. The left image is directly out of the camera (RAW). In the right image “noise reduction” was applied. In the following assignments on this page I will research different cameras as well as image recording methods and then apply some post processing tricks.

Henri

May 19, 2017 – The subject of image quality made me really think. How much does it really matter if you don’t display your images on a large screen, or print large banners. Most of my images are displayed on a standard computer LCD screen. I took some pictures of a newly purchased flower pot label from about 1 meter away, with a 35 mm lens. Here are two quality comparisons taken with my old Canon Rebel XSI, a now somewhat obsolete 12 MegaPixel camera. The camera has 5 sensivity settings, ISO 100, 200, 400, 800 and 1600, and 4 quality settings, Raw, Large JPG, Medium JPG and Small JPG.

Large JPG – ISO 1600 (Left) and ISO 100 (Right)
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Large JPG compared with Smal JPG format, both at ISO 1600
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The difference between RAW and Large JPG are not directly apparent when viewing it directly on-screen. The difference only becomes apparent in certain post processing operations.